Archive | February, 2010

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (461-480)

27 Feb

Here is another 20 to add to the list.

Remember that there is no ranking system here, and if you don’t see your favorite jazz album yet, it doesn’t mean it won’t show up.

Every week I will offer up twenty more, in no particular order and with no ranking system or common theme (other than jazz of course).

Hopefully these lists will inspire you to seek some of these albums out that perhaps you haven’t heard before, or revisit an old favorite. And as always, we want your thoughts on any or all of these albums. Either way, let’s get started with this week, and in no particular order, albums 461 through 480.

P.S. – You may notice a common theme among the musicians this week.

461. Pete Fountain’s New Orleans – Pete Fountain (MCA Records, 1957)

462. Piano in E – Solo Piano – Ellis Marsalis (Rounder, 1986)

463. New Orleans, Vol. 1 – Preservation Hall Jazz Band (Columbia, 1977)

464. Strange Fruit – Irvin Mayfield and The New Orleans Jazz Orchestra (Basin Street Records, 2005)

465. The Library of Congress Recordings (compilation) – Jelly Roll Morton (Rounder, 1938 recording dates, 2007 compilation release date)

466. Al Hirt’s Jazz Band Ball – Al Hirt (1956)

467. Mysterious Shorter – Nicholas Payton (Chesky, 2006)

468. Louis Armstrong and King Oliver (compilation) – Louis Armstrong and King Oliver (Milestone Records, 1923-24 recording dates, 1977 release date)

469. Oh, My Nola – Harry Connick, Jr. (Columbia, 2007)

470. Bounce – Terence Blanchard (Blue Note, 2003)

471. Live at Newport – Mahalia Jackson (Columbia, 1958)

472. Trio Jeepy – Branford Marsalis (Columbia, 1988)

473. The Fabulous Sidney Bechet – Sidney Bechet (Blue Note, 1958)

474. In Binghamton, N.Y., Vol. 2 – De De and Billie Pierce (American Recordings, 1962)

475. The Legendary Kid – Kid Ory (Good Time Jazz, 1956)

476. Duke Elegant – Dr. John (Blue Note, 2000)

477. Funeral For a Friend – Dirty Dozen Brass Band (Ropeadope Records, 2004)

478. Live at Blues Alley – Wynton Marsalis (Columbia, 1987)

479. The Bright Mississippi – Allen Toussaint (Nonesuch Records, 2009)

480. Jump, Jive, and Wail: The Essential Louis Prima (compilation) – Louis Prima (Capitol/EMI Records, 2007)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (441-460)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (421-440)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (401-420)

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 7 (Quarterfinals): University of North Texas One O' Clock Lab Band vs. the BYU Synthesis Big Band

23 Feb

Congratulations to the week 6 winner, the Whitworth University Jazz Ensemble I, who beat the University Northern Colorado Jazz Lab Band I with a whopping 88% of the vote.

The quarterfinals continue now, and I expect some close matchups. Week 7 begins now, with the quarterfinal match up between the University of North Texas One O’ Clock Lab Band versus the BYU Synthesis Big Band.

To see the bracket, click here.

Each week, two college or university big bands will “face off”. You, as the reader, will listen to a song from each band, and then vote for the one you like the best. After the week is over, one team will move on to the next round, and we will feature two new bands. The last band standing is the Clash of the College Bands winner.

Below are the next two school bands.

Click on the link for each school below. Audio will begin in a new page. After you have listened to each band, vote on the one you like the best.

University of North Texas One O’ Clock Lab Band – Dark Matters

BYU Synthesis Big Band – Begin the Beguine

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 6 (quarterfinals): University of Northern Colorado Jazz Lab Band I vs Whitworth University Jazz Ensemble I

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 5 (quarterfinals): University of Miami Concert Jazz Band vs. University of Northern Iowa Jazz Band I

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 4: Michigan State University Jazz Ensemble I vs. University of North Texas Two O’ Clock Lab Band

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 3: University of North Florida Jazz Ensemble vs. BYU Synthesis Big Band

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 2: Willamette University Jazz Collective vs. University of Northern Colorado Jazz Lab Band 1

Clash of the College Bands Tourney Begins Now! Week 1: University of Miami Concert Jazz Band vs. Princeton University Big Band

Clash of the College Bands

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 7 (Quarterfinals): University of North Texas One O’ Clock Lab Band vs. the BYU Synthesis Big Band

23 Feb

Congratulations to the week 6 winner, the Whitworth University Jazz Ensemble I, who beat the University Northern Colorado Jazz Lab Band I with a whopping 88% of the vote.

The quarterfinals continue now, and I expect some close matchups. Week 7 begins now, with the quarterfinal match up between the University of North Texas One O’ Clock Lab Band versus the BYU Synthesis Big Band.

To see the bracket, click here.

Each week, two college or university big bands will “face off”. You, as the reader, will listen to a song from each band, and then vote for the one you like the best. After the week is over, one team will move on to the next round, and we will feature two new bands. The last band standing is the Clash of the College Bands winner.

Below are the next two school bands.

Click on the link for each school below. Audio will begin in a new page. After you have listened to each band, vote on the one you like the best.

University of North Texas One O’ Clock Lab Band – Dark Matters

BYU Synthesis Big Band – Begin the Beguine

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 6 (quarterfinals): University of Northern Colorado Jazz Lab Band I vs Whitworth University Jazz Ensemble I

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 5 (quarterfinals): University of Miami Concert Jazz Band vs. University of Northern Iowa Jazz Band I

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 4: Michigan State University Jazz Ensemble I vs. University of North Texas Two O’ Clock Lab Band

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 3: University of North Florida Jazz Ensemble vs. BYU Synthesis Big Band

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 2: Willamette University Jazz Collective vs. University of Northern Colorado Jazz Lab Band 1

Clash of the College Bands Tourney Begins Now! Week 1: University of Miami Concert Jazz Band vs. Princeton University Big Band

Clash of the College Bands

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (441-460)

20 Feb

Here is another 20 to add to the list.

Remember that there is no ranking system here, and if you don’t see your favorite jazz album yet, it doesn’t mean it won’t show up.

Every week I will offer up twenty more, in no particular order and with no ranking system or common theme (other than jazz of course).

Hopefully these lists will inspire you to seek some of these albums out that perhaps you haven’t heard before, or revisit an old favorite. And as always, we want your thoughts on any or all of these albums. Either way, let’s get started with this week, and in no particular order, albums 441 through 460.

441. Search For the New Land – Lee Morgan (Toshiba EMI, 1964)

442. Chile Con Soul – Poncho Sanchez (Concord Picante, 1989)

443. Unforgettable: A Tribute to Dinah Washington – Aretha Franklin (Edsel, 1964)

444. Cannonball & Coltrane – Cannonball Adderley and John Coltrane (Emarcy, 1959)

445. The Hawk Flies High – Coleman Hawkins (Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab, 1957)

446. Gunn Fu – Russell Gunn (High Note, 1997)

447. Reach – Jacky Terrasson (Parlophone Records, 1996)

448. Cyrus Chestnut – Cyrus Chestnut (Atlantic, 1998)

449. The Best of Slim Gaillard: Laughin’ in Rhythm – Slim Gaillard (Verve, 1994)

450. Sweet Home Cookin’ – Karrin Allyson (Concord, 1994)

451. The Thelonious Monk Orchrstra at Town Hall – Thelonious Monk (Original Jazz Classics, 1959)

452. So What? – Monty Alexander (Black & Blue, 1979)

453. To Bird With Love – Eddie Daniels (GRP Records, 1987)

454. Midnight Special – Jimmy Smith (Blue Note, 1960)

455. Jazz at Massey Hall – The Quintet (Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Bud Powell, Charles Mingus, Max Roach) (Original Jazz Classics, 1953)

456. After the Morning – John Hicks (Unidisc, 1979)

457. Twentysomething – Jamie Cullum (Verve, 2004)

458. The Happy Blues – Gene Ammons (Prestige/OJC, 1956)

459. One More Once – Michel Camilo (Columbia, 1995)

460. 100 Years of Django – Frank Vignola (Azica Records, 2009)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (421-440)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (401-420)

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 6 (Quarterfinals): University of Northern Colorado Jazz Lab Band I vs. Whitworth University Jazz Ensemble I

17 Feb

Congratulations to the week 5 winner, the University of Northern Iowa Jazz Band I, who edged out the University of Miami Concert Jazz Band with 54% of the vote.

The quarterfinals continue now, and I expect some close matchups. Week 6 begins now, with the quarterfinal match up between the University of Northern Colorado Jazz Ensemble versus the Whitworth University Jazz Ensemble I.

To see the bracket, click here.

Each week, two college or university big bands will “face off”. You, as the reader, will listen to a song from each band, and then vote for the one you like the best. After the week is over, one team will move on to the next round, and we will feature two new bands. The last band standing is the Clash of the College Bands winner.

Below are the next two school bands.

Click on the link for each school below. Audio will begin in a new page. After you have listened to each band, vote on the one you like the best.

University of Northern Colorado Lab Band 1 – Flux in the Box (audio made available by UNC Jazz Studies website)

Whitworth University Jazz Ensemble I – Apple Flambe’ (from the CD “Apple Flambe'”)

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 5 (quarterfinals): University of Miami Concert Jazz Band vs. University of Northern Iowa Jazz Band I

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 4: Michigan State University Jazz Ensemble I vs. University of North Texas Two O’ Clock Lab Band

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 3: University of North Florida Jazz Ensemble vs. BYU Synthesis Big Band

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 2: Willamette University Jazz Collective vs. University of Northern Colorado Jazz Lab Band 1

Clash of the College Bands Tourney Begins Now! Week 1: University of Miami Concert Jazz Band vs. Princeton University Big Band

Clash of the College Bands

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 5 (Quarterfinals): University of Miami Concert Jazz Band vs. University of Northern Iowa Jazz Band 1

9 Feb

Congratulations to the week 4 winner, University of North Texas Two O’ Clock Lab Band, who beat the Michigan State with 72% of the vote.

Now we head into the quarterfinals, and I expect some close matchups. Week 5 begins now, with the quarterfinal match up between the University of Miami Concert Jazz Band versus the University of Northern Iowa Jazz Band I.

To see the bracket, click here.

Each week, two college or university big bands will “face off”. You, as the reader, will listen to a song from each band, and then vote for the one you like the best. After the week is over, one team will move on to the next round, and we will feature two new bands. The last band standing is the Clash of the College Bands winner.

Below are the next two school bands.

Click on the link for each school below. Audio will begin in a new page. After you have listened to each band, vote on the one you like the best.

University of Miami Concert Jazz Band – Nasty Blues (audio made available by YouTube post)

University of Northern Iowa Jazz Band I – samples of Passages, Adam’s Apple, What is this Thing Called Love?, and Nardis

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 4: Michigan State University Jazz Ensemble I vs. University of North Texas Two O’ Clock Lab Band

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 3: University of North Florida Jazz Ensemble vs. BYU Synthesis Big Band

Clash of the College Bands Tourney – Week 2: Willamette University Jazz Collective vs. University of Northern Colorado Jazz Lab Band 1

Clash of the College Bands Tourney Begins Now! Week 1: University of Miami Concert Jazz Band vs. Princeton University Big Band

Clash of the College Bands

Pat Metheny's Robot Army

8 Feb

Guitarist Pat Metheny’s new CD Orchestrion is a modern take on an old attempt at futuristic musical mechanics. Originated in the late 18th century, utilizing music rolls or pinned cylinders, the complex machinery would tap on drums, “blow” wind through pipes or other wind instruments, “play” piano keys and “pluck” strings. Indeed, these were some of the most complex machines in the world more than two centuries ago.

Pat Metheny has taken these concepts and developed a new form of orchestrion, still using acoustic instruments and complex machinery, but with the ability to trigger the “band” from his own guitar. Frankly, I’m not that familiar with this concept, so maybe you should just check out this video of Pat putting the album together. Comments encouraged!

Pat Metheny’s Robot Army

8 Feb

Guitarist Pat Metheny’s new CD Orchestrion is a modern take on an old attempt at futuristic musical mechanics. Originated in the late 18th century, utilizing music rolls or pinned cylinders, the complex machinery would tap on drums, “blow” wind through pipes or other wind instruments, “play” piano keys and “pluck” strings. Indeed, these were some of the most complex machines in the world more than two centuries ago.

Pat Metheny has taken these concepts and developed a new form of orchestrion, still using acoustic instruments and complex machinery, but with the ability to trigger the “band” from his own guitar. Frankly, I’m not that familiar with this concept, so maybe you should just check out this video of Pat putting the album together. Comments encouraged!

Groove Notes: The New Orleans Conclusion

6 Feb

When I do get out of town, I want to make it count. It has been over a week since I returned from my first trip to New Orleans, and I wanted my emotions from the trip to die down a little bit before I finished my review of it, maybe to just be able to write with a clearer head.

The experiences, be it jazz related or not from this trip, are still extremely vivid. So ahead of time, forgive me if this entry seems personal, and shares a variety of personal thoughts in addition to just “jazzy” ones.

One thing I wanted to make sure I saw while I was there was the Musicians’ Village. This is a community conceived by Branford Marsalis and Harry Connick Jr., to provide adequate housing for artists and musicians of the city who were displaced by Hurricane Katrina.

Once the cab driver stopped telling me that it would be much “safer” for him to take me on a tour to see all of Brad Pitt’s houses rather than drop me off in the middle of what he called a “rough” neighborhood, he started pointing out remnants of Katrina devastation as we headed through town. It has been 4 1/2 years since Katrina hit, and while his voice began to crack when talking about what people went through, this was just a preview of how the people of this city are not over what happened here.

It ended up being too early in the morning for me to catch any musicians out and about in the Village (as it should be…what decent working New Orleans musician is up and about at 9:30 in the morning?). However the opportunity to see this community built for and by the people who have helped make New Orleans what it is was incredibly inspiring.

While not something that people always think of when New Orleans is mentioned, I also paid a visit to the National World War II Museum on Magazine Street. I am certainly a museum fan, but the museum offered a truly emotional experience. I don’t doubt that my traveling partner, nor myself will ever be able to get the images of the brave soldiers who stormed the beaches from our memory. Definitely a moment that choked us both up.

The Louis Armstrong Park was closed for repairs. Still, the park seemed inviting enough for the two of us. There are certain things you have to see, so you see them.

The park hosts the Mahalia Jackson Performance Center, Congo Square, and the old studios of the legendary radio station WWOZ.

I came to realize, as I was literally stuck in a gate leaving the park, that I had eaten way to well on this trip. My traveling partner may very well have wet herself while dying of laughter while I squeezed myself out, and it was at that moment that I dedicated myself to the gym upon my return for 2 1/2 hours, every single day.

The last couple nights I was there I had the opportunity to see Charmaine Neville one night and trumpeter Terence Blanchard the next, both at Snug Harbor. These are two musicians deeply rooted in the New Orleans community. Again, with Charmaine Neville, evidence of the lingering effects of Katrina are still vivid in her mind, as she spent a great deal of time thanking those who recently visited for their help in still ongoing repair efforts.

If you watched the Spike Lee film When the Levees Broke, you may recall seeing Terence Blanchard walking his mother through her house following the hurricane. Since then, Blanchard has completely dedicated himself to the rebuilding of New Orleans, and on that night I got to see him continue to be one of the most prolific storytellers via his trumpet.

New Orleans was a lot of things for me. It was great jazz and haunted hotel rooms. It was Beignets and Cafe Au Lait. It was a muffaletta sandwich on the Mississippi River, and late night karaoke. It was Snug Harbor, the Spotted Cat Music Club, Pat O’ Brien’s, Preservation Hall, Blues Alley, and DBA. It was the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, Terence Blanchard, The Hot Club of New Orleans, Charmaine Neville, and the everyday brass band that just went playing down the street like it was an everyday walk. It was a overtime field goal followed by a city-wide celebration. It was head-butting over which street is the right street to go down, and of course, me being wrong about it. It was jambalaya and Po-Boy sandwiches.

It was Sidney Bechet, Pete Fountain, Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton, the Marsalis Family, Irma Thomas, Fats Domino, Professor Longhair, and Mahalia Jackson. It was the ghosts of Congo Square.

But mostly for me, it was seeing a city that has rebuilt after major fires, and continues to rebuild after a massive hurricane. It was seeing people who 4 1/2 years ago lost their home celebrating in the streets. It was seeing that the people of this city will never allow it to be destroyed.

Go Saints! Who Dat!

Groove Notes, Live From New Orleans Day 2 (Music and Football)

Groove Notes, Live From New Orleans, Day 1

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (421-440)

6 Feb

Here is another 20 to add to the list.

Remember that there is no ranking system here, and if you don’t see your favorite jazz album yet, it doesn’t mean it won’t show up.

Every week I will offer up twenty more, in no particular order and with no ranking system or common theme (other than jazz of course).

Hopefully these lists will inspire you to seek some of these albums out that perhaps you haven’t heard before, or revisit an old favorite. And as always, we want your thoughts on any or all of these albums. Either way, let’s get started with this week, and in no particular order, albums 421 through 440.

421. The Cats – Tommy Flanagan with John Coltrane and Kenny Burrell (New Jazz/OJC, 1957)

422. The Quintessential Billie Holiday, Vol. 2 (1936, compilation) – Billie Holiday (Columbia, 1987)

423. Money Jungle – Duke Ellington (Blue Note, 1962)

424. Stan Getz with Cal Tjader – Stan Getz (Fantasy/OJC, 1958)

425. It’s All in the Game – Eric Alexander (Highnote, 2006)

426. Iron Man – Eric Dolphy (Westwind, 1963)

427. Fat Albert Rotunda – Herbie Hancock (WEA, 1968)

428. Barefoot Boy – Larry Coryell (One Way, 1971)

429. Eye of the Beholder – Chick Corea (GRP Records, 1988)

430. Of Kindred Souls – Roy Hargrove (Novus, 1993)

431. The Paris Concert, Edition One – Bill Evans (Blue Note, 1979)

432. Red Earth – Dee Dee Bridgewater (Emarcy/URGD, 2007)

433. Lester Leaps In – Count Basie (Epic, 1936-40 recording dates, 1955 release date)

434. Stormy Monday – Lou Rawls (Blue Note, 1962)

435. Soul Sauce: Memories of Cal Tjader – Poncho Sanchez (Concord, 1995)

436. On Fire – Michel Camilo (Epic, 1989)

437. Serenade to a Soul Sister – Horace Silver (Blue Note, 1968)

438. Screamin’ the Blues – Oliver Nelson (Original Jazz Classics, 1960)

439. Wynton Marsalis – Wynton Marsalis (Columbia, 1981)

440. Kind of Brown – Christian McBride (Mack Avenue, 2009)

1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die (401-420)

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